7 Hidden Truths of Testing, #2: Testing Experiences Vary Widely

By James Comans Welcome back to “7 Hidden Truths of Testing,” in which we examine the realities of standardized testing in Mississippi from the educator’s point of view. This is not filtered research from a corporation; it’s not a scientific study from a government agency. It’s just testimony from the people seeing it happen on […]

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7 Hidden Truths of Testing, #1: Learning is Disrupted

By James Comans Welcome to an MSEdBlog series this week called 7 Hidden Truths of Testing. In this series, I’m going to tell you 7 things about standardized testing in Mississippi that you, the taxpayer, probably don’t know. It’s not because nobody knows it’s happening, or because we educators don’t want you to know… It’s just kind of like Fight […]

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New national report investigates teacher evaluations; MSEdBlogger key writer

The Network for Public Education published a report today entitled “Teachers Talk Back: Educators on the Impact of Teacher Evaluation.” Tupelo teacher and MSEdBlog editor Amanda Koonlaba was one of the eight educators who wrote the report. The “Teachers Talk Back” report chronicles a study from the fall of 2015, in which NPE investigated teacher turnover and frustration […]

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Loudermouth: Bryant outlines plan to have public school teachers exterminated

Filed under Satire, for some reason. By Jackson Loudermouth, Reporter for MSEdBlog Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant, fresh off signing into law the controversial “religious freedom” bill HB 1523, turned his cross hairs from the LGBT community to the public school system. “We’ve got to do something about the teachers, ok?” Bryant said to the media […]

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Hughes: MS Education Campaign Promises: Fiction vs. Reality

By Representative Jay Hughes, special to the blog MS Education Campaign Promises: Fiction vs. Reality: (Disclaimer: Independent thoughts and opinions follow) FICTION: During the battle over Initiative 42 vs. 42A, the incumbent politicians and majority leadership claimed: “We are for public education – We just don’t want “a single judge in Hinds County” telling us […]

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Yet Another Reason Mississippi Teachers are Leaving

By James Comans, Editor at MSEdBlog I want to tell you about a Mississippi teacher. I’ll call her Hannah. Hannah is a middle school language arts teacher from central Mississippi. She’s flat out brilliant. I remember when I first met her, we were in this little conference room building in Starkville- basically a shed next to […]

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MSEDBLOG Book Club: Making the Grades!

The Mississippi Education Blog would like to invite you to participate in a book study of Making the Grades by Todd Farley. On March 12, James Comans presented three reasons to read this book.  He wrote that the book is funny, real, and important. Notably, Comans stated, Farley reveals valuable information as to how the standardized testing […]

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Let’s Tackle Testing: 3 reasons to read Todd Farley’s “Making the Grades”

By James Comans Standardized testing is a huge issue in American education today. Big Testing companies are so heavily involved in influencing policy that sooner or later, Mississippi parents, educators, and lawmakers will have to discuss it. For real. Right now, we’re fighting over funding for our schools, but eventually, we’re going to have to talk […]

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Koonlaba: What do you think about these ways to never praise a student?

I recently read an article titled, 3 Ways You Should Never Praise Students. I can’t remember how I stumbled across this post from 2012. However, since reading it I’ve been doing a lot of thinking about the way I use praise in my classroom. In fact, it was so thought-provoking I shared it in my […]

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School Funding Fix: A Crazy Plan C

For years Mississippi’s public schools have had trouble scrounging up cash to pay the bills. Classrooms languish in disrepair, students go without desperately-needed instructional tech, and a brand new question is emerging: Are we using 1960’s history textbooks because we can’t afford the upgrade to 2016, or because we don’t want it? At any rate, […]

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